GPI views and policy proposals are based on in-depth research

Our Publications

The GPI draws on both a rich pool of international thinkers, academics, and professionals from diverse backgrounds, including international affairs, banking and finance, industry, technology and science, media and international organisations. What we all have in common is a strong belief that new and fresh ideas are needed for a rapidly changing world, and a shared dedication to devising innovative yet practical policy solutions to that can make a real difference.

Jains, Wealth And Ethics. Lessons For A Godless Capitalism

“It is as hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven as a camel to pass through the eye of a needle.” This was one of the pictorial worms inserted in our minds by an earnest and...
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Brexit: The Constitutional Problem

There is a great deal of misleading discussion across the media and, indeed by MPs and government ministers, about the constitutional failure of the government and of parliament. The May-led government has undoubtedly made catastrophic misjudgements in its desire to...
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Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing: The Muslim Brotherhood and Qatar in Europe

The Muslim Brotherhood movement is not only the oldest but also the largest and potentially the most dangerous Islamist movement in the world. While states like Turkey and Qatar have long supported the Brotherhood, in recent years, and especially since...
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Russia’s pivot to the east: Where does it leave the EU?

As relations between the EU and Russia remain frosty, Moscow has pivoted towards Beijing in search of deeper strategic cooperation. How can Europe re-engage with a Russia increasingly focused on (Eur)asia? This week marks the five-year anniversary of the Maidan...
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India must talk to China – it can put more pressure on Pakistan than USA

On February 14, a Jaish-e-Mohammad militant drove a car packed with explosives into a Central Reserve Police Force convoy in Kashmir, killing more than 40 personnel and triggering a potential crisis in the subcontinent. In the week that followed, the...
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PARLIAMENTARY CONTROL OF BREXIT IS EASIER SAID THAN DONE

A frequent criticism of the Prime Minister is that she prematurely triggered the Article 50 negotiations in March 2017 and did so without a realistic plan for their conduct. If she had waited longer and planned better, her critics contend,...
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Win some, lose some: Iran, the EU and Trump’s three-way game

Just days before the Islamic Republic of Iran celebrates its 40th anniversary on February 11, Europe has offered it a gift. Ever since last May, when Washington pulled out of the nuclear deal signed under then-President Barack Obama and reimposed sanctions on Iran, Europe has promised to soften...
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The deep roots of the trust crisis

Sigmund Freud, the public affairs industry, and the internet may all have played a part, write Isabelle Stanley and Rod Dowler. We all depend in our social, business, financial, and political affairs, on a shared currency of trust. But we...
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BREXIT: WILL PARLIAMENT DECIDE IN FEBRUARY WHAT IT FAILED TO DECIDE IN JANUARY?

Four conclusions emerge from the series of votes on Brexit in the House of Commons this week (29th January): • First, this government is so paralysed by internal division that it is incapable of pursuing any coherent policy in the negotiations....
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It’s Time to Trust the Taliban

Afghanistan’s jihadi insurgents are ready to give America what it wants: defeat without humiliation. In the peace process now underway with the Afghan Taliban, one-and-a-half significant U.S. interests are at stake. The “half” is the only real hang-up to signing...
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The Limits of no Boundaries and the Necessity of Self-Assertion

If Europe wants to maintain its influential place in the world, once again it has to enhance the role of its nation states. ‘Internal diversity and external unity’ would be a viable motto for a rejuvenated European Union to adopt....
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Western Nations Are Repeating the Mistakes of 1914

In their enthusiasm for a new cold war against China and Russia, the Western establishments of today are making a mistake comparable to that of their forebears of 1914. This year saw the centennial anniversary of the end of the...
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Is Winning Over Germany The Real Objective Behind China’s CEE Diplomacy?

China has been ramping up its political and economic ties with Central and Eastern Europe “CEE” in recent years. But, beyond the growing skeptical media attention pointing to China’s ambitions in competing with the European Union “EU” and major western...
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European and Indian Perceptions of the Belt and Road Initiative

It is becoming clear that China’s ambitious Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) linking Asia and Africa with Europe through a network of various transportation corridors could fundamentally reshape the geo-economics and geopolitics of the whole Eurasian region and beyond. As...
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World Order Revisited: Resilience and Challenges

Despite many hiccups along the road and differing conceptions of what form it would take, throughout the post-Cold War period both Russia and the European Union remained committed to the aim of creating a single European space from Lisbon to...
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